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Animal Farm by George Orwell Chapter 07

Animal Farm by George Orwell Chapter 07

Animal Farm by George Orwell Summary (Question and Answer)

Chapter Seven

CHAPTER SEVEN

1.

54

February saw the weather deteriorate even further and soon the animals were facing an extreme shortage of food. Aware that the outside world was now focusing all of their attention on Animal Farm, Napoleon decided that it would be necessary to show them that the animals were not close to starvation. Accordingly he hatched a plan to impress Mr Whymper in the hope that the solicitor would convince the outside world that there were no food shortages after all. Name two ways in which Napoleon achieved this? 

In an attempt to convince Mr Whymper that there was no food shortage at Animal Farm, Napoleon tried two main tactics. The first of these was to arrange for Mr Whymper to overhear a number of staged conversations about how the rations were being increased. The second tactic used by Napoleon was to convince Mr Whymper that their store houses were full of grain by arranging for the grain-bins to be filled from the bottom up with sand. On the very top of which a small amount of grain would be sprinkled to give the impression that they were better stocked than they were in reality.

2.

56

Despite his posturing, it soon became obvious to Napoleon that Animal Farm would need to procure more grain or face starvation. Coming to an arrangement with Mr. Whymper, what did the pig arrange to sell in return for enough grain and meal to keep the farm going until the summer and what was the reaction from the animals affected?

Napoleon arranged with Mr Whymper to supply four hundred eggs a week enabling the farm to secure a large quantity of grain. The chickens were extremely angry at this decision and argued that to take the eggs away at this point would amount to murder.

3.

56

With growing discontent, the farm soon approached a state of rebellion. How did the hens attempt to thwart Napoleon’s plans?

In an attempt to thwart Napoleon’s plans the hens started to fly up to the rafters to lay their eggs which would then fall to the floor and break.

4.

56

Infuriated by this protest, Napoleon ordered a halt to the hen’s rations. All other animals were forbidden to give any grain to the hens, a rule enforced by the death penalty. The hens held out for five days but finally capitulated after a number of hens died. How many hens perished as a result of this protest?

The protest came at a heavy cost of life and nine of the hens perished.

5.

57-58

For the rest of the winter whenever anything went wrong it was blamed on Snowball who was said to creep into the farm at night and set about doing damage. After several months of accusations, and a number of attempts to find the pig, Napoleon announced that he finally knew where Snowball was hiding. Where was this and what did Napoleon report that Snowball was planning?

Squealer told the animals that Snowball had sold himself to the owner of Pinchfield Farm and they were now planning to invade Animal Farm with Snowball acting as the guide.

6.

59-60

Soon Napoleon was said to have discovered a number of documents which categorically proved that Snowball had been a secret agent working for Mr Jones from the very start. When this news was relayed to the animals by Squealer, many of the animals, including Boxer, refused to believe it. How did Squealer finally manage to persuade Boxer that it was true?

Squealer tried many different tactics in an attempt to persuade Boxer that Snowball had always been working for Mr Jones but finally succeeded in convincing him by arguing that ‘Our Leader, Comrade Napoleon’ believes it to have been the case. As Boxer always believed everything that Napoleon said, he quickly changed his mind and agreed that ‘if Napoleon says it is true then it must be so’.

7.

61

After a few days, Napoleon called an assembly; during this meeting he accused four of the animals of working with Snowball. Who were these animals and how did they react to these accusations?

Napoleon accused four pigs, who had earlier voiced their opposition to his policies, of working with Snowball. The four pigs were rounded up by a number of Napoleon’s attack dogs. Injured and at Napoleon’s mercy, all four pigs quickly confessed to the crime of helping Snowflake.

8.

61

How were the four animals accused of helping Snowbull punished by Napoleon?

Napoleon ordered that the four pigs accused of helping snowbull should be executed by having their throats torn out by the dogs.

9.

62

After the four animals had been dealt with, Napoleon asked the animals if anyone else had anything to confess. A number of animals came forward to confess everything from stealing a small amount of grain to seeing snowflake in their dreams. How were these animals punished and how did the other assembled animals feel about this?

All of the animals who came forward and confessed to a crime were put to death. The assembled animals were all shocked by the scenes of bloodshed and left feeling greatly disturbed by what they had witnessed.

10.

63

Boxer was as deeply affected by the scenes of murder and slaughter as anybody. How did he explain the incident and how did he decide to atone for the errors which had, in his opinion, led to the bloody scenes that he had witnessed.

After some deliberation and deep thought, Boxer concluded that the problems being witnessed on the farm must be ‘due to some fault in ourselves’. To atone for this, Boxer decided that he would awake a full hour before everyone else in the future so that he could achieve even more before the others woke up.

11.

64

Clover was affected by what she had witnessed in an altogether different way. Even though she lacked the language to express it clearly, she realised that the Animal Farm in which she was living was not the Animal Farm that she had fought for or that Old Major had dreamt of. Whilst Clover was unable to adequately express this in words, she did find a way to do so. How was this and how did Squealer respond when he witnessed this?

In an attempt to voice what she was feeling, Clover began to sing ‘Beasts of England’. Soon she was joined by many others who joined in her slow and pitiful rendition of the song. When Squealer heard the animals singing ‘Beasts of England’ he quickly rushed over to them and told them that the song was now forbidden. ‘Beasts of England’ was replaced by a two line refrain written by Minimus which was to be sung on all official occasions in the future.

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Animal Farm by George Orwell Chapter 08

Animal Farm by George Orwell Chapter 08

Animal Farm by George Orwell Summary (Question and Answer)

Chapter Eight

CHAPTER EIGHT.

1.

66

A few days after the executions, a number of the animals began to discuss the Seven Commandments and a number of them seemed to remember that the Sixth Commandment stated that ‘No Animal shall kill any other animal’. If this was the case, then the executions would have clearly been in violation of the seven commandments. Upon closer inspection, however, it was discovered that the sixth commandment had not been violated after all. Explain why this was.

Concerned about the seven commandments, a number of the animals went to the barn to study them. When Muriel read the sixth commandment the animals realised that they had all forgotten the last two words. It read ‘No Animal shall kill any other animal without cause’. As the executed animals had all been in league with Snowball, Napoleon had clearly had a very good reason to kill them.

2.

67

Napoleon was no longer seen in public with any regularity, rather he spent the majority of his time in the farm house. When he was seen in public he was always surrounded by his attack dogs and was now also accompanied by a black cockerel who would act as a ‘kind of trumpeter’. After the ‘battle of the Cowshed’, when Mr Jones’s gun was recovered, it had been decided that it would be fired twice yearly to mark the two most important anniversaries of Animal Farm. The first of these was the Revolution itself, the second was the battle of the Cowshed. It was now decreed that the gun would be fired on an additional occasion. What was this?

It was announced that, in addition to the official anniversaries of Animal Farm, the gun would also be fired on Napoleon’s birthday.

3.

67-68

Napoleon became excessively celebrated by many of the animals and soon had a poem written about him by Minimus. Napoleon ordered that this poem should be written on the wall of the barn opposite the seven commandments and was accompanied by a portrait of Napoleon in profile. To emphasise the unrivalled importance of Napoleon, what was he soon officially known as?

Napoleon was soon officially known as ‘Our Leader, Comrade Napoleon’.

4.

69

Animal farm was bordered by two other farms. One of these was run by a human called Frederick and the other by a man called Pilkington. The animals didn’t trust either one of these on account that they were human, but which of them did the animals particularly hate and why?

The animals didn’t like either of the humans but they were especially wary of, and angry at, Frederick as it was constantly rumoured that he was harbouring Snowball and together they were plotting to invade animal farm.

5.

70

In the late summer, when the farm’s wheat crop was still growing, the animals were distraught to discover that it consisted largely of weeds. How was this explained?

It became known to the animals that Snowball had been responsible for the high weed content of the wheat crop as the pig had managed to mix the wheat seeds with weed seeds. This fact was discovered when a gander admitted to Squealer that he had been privy to the plot and proceeded to commit suicide on the spot.

6.

71

After many months of hard labour, the windmill was finally finished in the Autumn. The animals rejoiced and celebrated their achievement. Even Napoleon visited the building and congratulated the animals on all of their hard work. What name did Napoleon decide that the windmill should be given?

When Napoleon finally saw the completed building, he decided that the building should be known as ‘Napoleon’s Mill’.

7.

72

Just a few days after the windmill was completed, Napoleon called all of the animals together to announce that a buyer had now been organised for the timber pile which they had placed on the market earlier in the year. Who did Napoleon announce had bought the timber pile and how did he reassure the other animals when they appeared surprised by the buyer’s identity?

Napoleon informed the animals that Frederick would now be purchasing the timber pile. The animals were naturally very concerned by this announcement but Napoleon was able to win them over when he explained that the rumours which they had heard about Frederick harbouring Snowball were completely untrue, as were the rumours of an impending invasion. Instead Napoleon suggested that it was more likely that Pilkington was guilty of these things than Frederick.

8.

73

Just a matter of days after this announcement Napoleon was forced to call another meeting to tell the animals that Frederick had tricked him and got the timber for nothing. How had Frederick managed to trick Napoleon?

Frederick had originally offered to pay for the timber using a cheque, but Napoleon had insisted upon receiving cash as he thought this was the safer option. Unfortunately for the inhabitants of Animal Farm, Frederick had paid for the timber using forged money which was in fact worthless.

9.

73

Napoleon was furious with Frederick and announced that the farmer was now to be executed on sight. What method of execution did Napoleon decree?

Napoleon decreed that Frederick was to be boiled alive for his treachery.

10.

74

Following Frederick’s treachery, Napoleon warned the animals that the long expected attack could now be imminent and indeed it was. The next morning fifteen well armed men appeared at the front gate of Animal Farm. They fired their guns at the animals as they moved towards the newly constructed windmill. At first Napoleon was confident that the men wouldn’t be able to do any damage to so study a structure but Benjamin quickly realised their plan. How were the men able to destroy the windmill?

Frederick’s men were able to make a small hole at the base of the windmill which they then packed with blasting powder. Igniting this powder, the men were able to destroy the windmill leaving nothing but a black cloud of smoke where the building had once stood.

11.

75-76

When the animals saw that the men had destroyed their windmill, they were invigorated with a new found bravery and the animals charged the men. In the fierce battle which followed many animals and many men were badly injured and some killed but finally the men decided to flee for their lives. The animals were distraught at the loss of life and the destruction of their windmill which they had laboured for two years to build. Despite this, they were greeted by Squealer as they returned who, though he had been strangely absent during the battle, was now in a great mood. Why was Squealer in such a positive mood and why did Napoleon fire the gun seven times to mark the occasion?

Napoleon fired the gun seven times to mark the animal’s victory. Even though animals like boxer didn’t at first see what they were celebrating, the pigs led the animals in a great celebration to mark their apparent victory.

12.

77

During the two days of celebration which followed, Napoleon announced an official name for the battle and awarded a new military honour to mark the occasion. What was the name of the battle, and what was the name of the honour and to whom was it awarded?

The battle was officially known as the ‘Battle of the Windmill’. The new martial honour was named the ‘Order of the Green Banner’ and it was conferred by Napoleon on himself.

13.

78.

A number of days after these celebrations the pigs happened to stumble across a case of whisky one night. The evening proved to be an eventful one in which many of the pigs were heard to be singing and Napoleon was seen running around the courtyard wearing an old bowler hat which once belonged to Mr Jones. The next morning, however, Squealer found it necessary to address the animals and tell them that their beloved leader, Napoleon, was dying. What did Squealer tell the animals was Napoleon’s final order?

Squealer told the animals that Napoleon’s final order was that anyone found drinking alcohol was to be put to death.

14.

78-79

Despite the fears for Napoleon’s health voiced by Squealer, the following morning saw Napoleon looking considerably better. Following this dramatic recovery, what did Napoleon instruct Mr Whymper to purchase?

Following Napoleon’s dramatic recovery, he asked Mr Wymper to purchase some booklets on distilling and brewing.

15.

79

Napoleon soon gave an order to have the field which had previously been reserved for pensioned animals to graze in dug up and replanted with barley. Why do you think this was?

Napoleon had already ordered booklets on distilling and brewing. Barley is used to make beer and other alcoholic beverages and so it would seem likely that Napoleon was now preparing to manufacture alcoholic drinks.

16.

79.

At about this time the animals were all awoken by a large crash coming from the barn. What caused this noise?

This noise was caused by Squealer who appeared to have fallen from a ladder and now lay on the ground at the base of the seven commandments with a paint brush and paint pot by him. None of the animals could understand what had happened but a few days later Muriel noticed that she must has misremembered another one of the seven commandments as number five now read ‘no animal shall drink alcohol to excess’. Whilst Murial remembered the majority of the fifth commandment, she couldn’t remember the last two words again.

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Animal Farm by George Orwell Chapter 09

Animal Farm by George Orwell Chapter 09

Animal Farm by George Orwell Summary (Question and Answer)

Chapter Nine

CHAPTER NINE

1.

80

During the Battle of the Windmill, Boxer had suffered several injuries the most serious of which was a split hoof. Whilst many of the animals had tried to persuade him to take it easier, the horse would have none of it and started work again as soon as he could. At eleven years old, Boxer knew that he was under one year away from retirement yet he had one more ambition to achieve before this date. What did Boxer want to achieve before retiring?

Boxer wanted to see that the new windmill was well under way before he retired.

2.

81

Never talking about a rations ‘reduction’ but only a rations ‘readjustment’, Squealer explained to the animals that they would now have less food than previously though still, he claimed, more than they had enjoyed under Jones. Why, however, did Squealer claim that the ration reduction would not be proportional across the animal population but rather it would affect the Pigs and the dogs less than the others?

Squealer explained that ‘too rigid an equality in rations would have been contrary to the principles of Animalism’. Even though this didn’t seem very plausible, the other animals all believed him and tried to get used to frequently going to bed both hungry and cold.

3.

82

In addition to the shortage of food, extra mouths to feed also contributed to the lack of food. Where had the numbers increased the most dramatically?

The four sows had collectively given birth to thirty one young pigs. As Napoleon was the only male pig in the farm, it was easy enough to work out who their father was.

4.

82

Were these young pigs encouraged to mingle with the other animals?

No. Napoleon instructed the animals in the kitchen and planned to build them a separate school building for their further education. The young pigs also exercised alone, and were encouraged to remain aloof from the other animals.

5.

82

As the winter rolled in, two new rules were introduced concerning the pigs. What were these two new rules?

There were two new rules concerning the pigs introduced by Napoleon at this time. The first of these was that if an animal encountered a pig on a path, the animal should stand aside and let the pig pass. The second rule was that pigs were allowed to wear a green ribbon on their tails on Sundays.

6.

83

Whilst many were going hungry and cold, some of the animals noticed that the pigs didn’t seem to be suffering too badly. In fact they seemed to be putting on a little weight. One evening the animals of Animal Farm were excited to smell cooking barley and they wondered if they were going to be rewarded with a warm mash for their dinner. Sadly for them this didn’t materialise but a few days later they learned that the pigs now had an additional food ration. What was this?

The pigs were now receiving a pint of beer daily with the exception of Napoleon, who received half a gallon.

7.

83

The hardships endured by the animals were at least partially offset by an increase in the number of ceremonies, speeches, songs and speeches they enjoyed. Among these ceremonies, the weekly ‘Spontaneous Demonstration’ was a popular affair. Arranged to celebrate the struggles and victories of Animal Farm, the ceremony was attended by all of the animals who were rigidly organised into a set order. What did Boxer and Clover always carry when they attended these demonstrations?

Clover and Boxer always carried a green banner which was marked by the white horn and hoof. In addition this banner also carried the caption: ‘Long Live Comrade Napoleon’.

8.

84

As the year wore on, Animal Farm was declared a republic and it became necessary to elect a president. How many candidates stood for this position?

There was only one candidate who offered himself for election: Napoleon.

9.

84

In the middle of the summer the animals were greeted by an old resident. Who returned to Animal Farm? How did the Pigs react to the reappearance of this animal?

Moses, the raven, retuned to Animal Farm and started to tell all of the Animals about Sugar Candy Mountain, just as he had always done in Mr Jones’s day. The pigs displayed a strange attitude towards Moses. Whilst they publicly renounced his stories, they allowed him to stay in Animal Farm without doing any work and they even provided him with a ration of a gill of beer a day. 

10.

88

Once his hoof had sufficiently healed, Boxer worked harder than ever. Even though he was growing older and was no longer as powerful and strong as he once was, he never the less carried on working all the hours he could. Determined to get as much work done on the windmill before he retired, Boxer continued to work like a young horse until one day he suffered a terrible accident and couldn’t get up after a fall.

 

All of the animals attended to Boxer who was universally loved and Napoleon sent out word that the horse would be taken to the town to be looked after at a hospital. When the van arrived to transport Boxer away, Benjamin raised the alarm by telling the animals what was written on the side of the van into which Boxer had been loaded. What was written on the side of the van?

Benjamin, who never interfered with the running of the farm, alerted his fellow animals to what was written on the side of the van: ‘Alfred Simmonds, horse slaughterer and Glue boiler, Willingdon. Dealer in Hides and Bone-Meal. Kennels Supplied.’

11.

89

The animals tried to alert Boxer to what was written on the side of the van but the old horse no longer had the strength to escape the trap and the van soon vanished from Animal Farm, never to be seen again. Three days later, Squealer appeared before the animals to inform them about Boxer’s fate. What did he tell the animals had happened to the horse and what, according to the pig, were Boxer’s last words?

Squealer told the animals that Boxer had died in the hospital in Willingdon, despite the fact that he had received every medical attention available. According to Squealer, Boxer’s last words were: ‘Forward in the name of the Rebellion. Long Live Animal Farm! Long Live Comrade Napoleon! Napoleon is always right’.

12

90

The following Sunday, Napoleon addressed the animals on the subject of Boxer. He spoke at length about how loyal and honourable Boxer was before reminding all of the animals of Boxer’s two maxims: ‘I will work harder’ and ‘Napoleon is always right’. These, the pig told the animals, were maxims which they would all do well to adopt. Finally Napoleon told the animals that the pigs would mark Boxer’s passing. How did he tell the animals this would be done?

Napoleon told the animals that the pigs would mark Boxer’s death by hosting a banquet in his honour.

13

91

What did a grocery van deliver to the pigs to help them commemorate Boxer’s life?

The grocery van delivered a large wooden crate of whisky to help the pigs commemorate Boxer’s life. Where they got the money to buy the crate remained a mystery.

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Animal Farm by George Orwell Chapter 10

Animal Farm by George Orwell Chapter 10

Animal Farm by George Orwell Summary (Question and Answer)

Chapter Ten

CHAPTER TEN
1 92 After many years, the majority of the animals who could remember the rebellion had died. Even Mr Jones had died. Where did Mr Jones die? Mr Jones died in an inebriates’ home.
2 92 One of the few animals to still be alive was Clover. How old was she? We are told that Clover was two years passed retirement. As she was a horse, this would make her fourteen.
3 92 How many animals had retired when they reached their allotted age? None. No animal on Animal Farm had been allowed to retire no matter how long they lived.
4 93 Whilst the animals had successfully completed the windmill, and started work on a second, it had not been used to deliver the luxuries which Snowball had once promised. Instead these luxuries were denounced by Napoleon as against the principles of Animalism. Where, according to Napoleon, could true happiness be found? According to Napoleon, ‘the truest happiness…lay in working hard and living frugally’.
5 94-95 Whilst the farm as a whole seemed to be growing in wealth, the lives of the individual animals did not improve with the apparent exception of the pigs and the dogs. Yet all of the animals were still filled with pride to live in Animal Farm. Why was this? Even though their lives hadn’t seemed to change materially very much, the animals were all very proud to be a part of Animal Farm because it was still the only farm in existence which was run by the animals and not by humans.
7 95 One day, during the heat of the Summer, Squealer led a group of sheep to a remote part of the farm where he kept them for a number of days. What did he say he was doing with the sheep for which he needed privacy? Squealer told the animals that he needed to keep the sheep in seclusion whilst he taught them a new song.
8. 96 It wasn’t long after the sheep rejoined the other animals that Clover saw something which made her neigh in horror and surprise. What did Clover see which caused her to have this reaction? The thing which caused Clover to neigh in surprise and horror was the sight of Squealer walking on two legs.
9. 96-97 Soon the animals saw every pig who lived in Animal Farm walking on their hind legs only. Just as the animals were about to voice dissent, the sheep burst into a new song. What were the lyrics to this new song? The sheep burst into the new song which Squealer had taught them: ‘Four legs good, two legs better’.
10. 97 Taking Benjamin to one side, Clover asked the donkey to study the wall of the barn on which the seven commandments were written. What single phrase was now written in place of the seven commandments?

Written on the wall of the barn was a single message which now replaced the seven commandments:

ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL BUT SOME ANIMALS ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS.

11. 98 The day after Napoleon began to walk on two legs, the animals noticed that all of the pigs began to carry whips and even dressed in human clothing. A week later, a number of carts arrived at Animal Farm. Who had come to visit, and why? The carts brought the owners of several other local farms to visit Animal Farm. They came to inspect the farm’s working methods and enjoy dinner with the Pigs who were prepared to host them.
12. 99 Led by Clover, a number of the animals attempted to observe the goings-on in the farm house that evening. Looking in through the windows, they witnessed a number of the pigs sitting around a table with the humans. The group was drinking and enjoying a game of cards. Which member of the human contingent decided to make a speech and how did this speech end? Mr Pilkington of Foxwood made a speech in which he praised the pigs and argued that, whilst the neighbours had not always seen eye-to-eye, they were now delighted to work together and engage in trade. He completed his speech by raising a toast to ‘Animal Farm’.
13. 101 Napoleon responded to this toast very positively but wanted to correct the speaker on one point. What was this and how did Napoleon end his speech? Napoleon thanked Mr Pilkington for his kind words but wanted to correct him on one point. The farm was no longer to be called Animal Farm. Rather it was going to revert to its original name. Accordingly he ended his speech by raising a toast to ‘Manor Farm’.
14 102 As the animals watched the table, they began to find it increasingly difficult to distinguish between the pigs and the men. Finally, just as Clover began to lead the animals away, the animals heard the beginnings of an argument. What was the cause of this? The argument arose when the party began to play cards again and Napoleon and Mr Pilkington each played an ace of spades simultaneously!

 

 

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Animal Farm by George Orwell Chapter 06

Animal Farm by George Orwell Chapter 06

Animal Farm by George Orwell Summary (Question and Answer)

Chapter Six

CHAPTER SIX

1.

44

Orwell tells his readers that over the following year the animals worked like slaves and yet they were happy. Why was this?

The animals had to work harder than ever before but they were content to do so because they were working for themselves and not for the benefit of their former human masters.

2.

44

With the animals committed to constructing the windmill in addition to running the farm, Napoleon announced that the animals would now work on Sunday afternoons too. Whilst Napoleon insisted that this work was strictly voluntary, what penalty would be faced by any animal not volunteering?

Whilst the animals would have to volunteer to work on Sundays, Napoleon told them that if they decided not to work they would have their rations cut by half.

3.

45

One of the many unexpected difficulties presented by the construction of the windmill was how the animals could break the large pieces of limestone into pieces of suitable size. How did the animals eventually achieve this?

Many of stones were very large and none of the animals could use the tools necessary to break them into smaller pieces. Eventually they hit upon the idea of dragging the large boulders to the top of the quarry and throwing them off the side. When they hit the ground the boulders broke into smaller pieces at the bottom where they could be collected by the animals.

4.

45-46

All of the animals worked very hard but it was Boxer who proved to be the most indispensible. His size, strength and determination enabled him to do the work of many other animals combined. He was so committed to Animalism that he now struck a new agreement with the cockerel. What was this?

Boxer asked the cockerel to wake him three quarters of an hour earlier than anyone else so that he could start work even earlier than before.

5.

46-47

As the summer wore on, the animals began to realise that there were various shortages. They lacked all manner of things including paraffin, nails, string and dog biscuits. How were these shortages addressed?

As they were unable to produce these items themselves, Napoleon decided that it would now be necessary for Animal Farm to engage in trade with other farms to secure these items.

6.

47

Many of the animals were more than a little concerned about Napoleon’s solution to their shortages. How was Mr Whymper involved in the pig’s plans?

Mr Whymper was a local solicitor. Napoleon arranged for him to act as an intermediary and he would thus visit the farm once a week on a Monday to receive his instructions from Napoleon for the coming week.

7.

47

The animals were very wary of Mr Whymper and tried their best to avoid him. Despite their apprehensions, however, Mr Whymper’s visits did elicit a great deal of pride among the animals. Why was this?

The animals were very proud to see Mr Whymer, standing on two legs, receiving his orders from Napoleon who stood on all fours..

8.

49

As the financial relationship between Animal Farm and its human run neighbours steadily increased, the pigs shocked the other animals again by moving into the farm house. Squealer was once again sent out among the other animals to explain why this was a necessary development. What two arguments did he use to justify the pig’s decision?

Squealer justified Napoleon’s decision to move into the farm house in two ways. First of all he argued that the pigs, as the brains of the operation, needed a quiet place to live. Secondly he pointed out that Napoleon, as the animal’s leader, required a more dignified residence than a sty.

9.

49-50

Whilst Boxer automatically accepted the pig’s decision, Clover was less sure and felt sure that she remembered a rule about not sleeping in beds. When she failed to read the seven commandments which were still written on the wall of the barn, she asked Murial for her help. After some hard work, Murial managed to read the fourth commandment which concerned sleeping in beds. How did the fourth commandment now read?

Murial struggled to read the fourth commandment but, when she finally succeeded, it read ‘no animal shall sleep in a bed with sheets’.

10.

50

Several days after the pigs had moved into the farmhouse, they announced a change to their sleeping schedule. What was this?

The pigs announced that they would now sleep an hour later than the other animals.

11.

51

The animals continued to work hard building the windmill, which was now half complete, and Boxer even started to work alone at night, completing one or two hours extra labour by the light of the moon. One of the animals was less than enthusiastic about the windmill however. Who was this?

All of the animals were very proud of the windmill except Benjamin who remained unenthusiastic and repeated his cryptic remark that ‘Donkeys live a long time’.

12.

52

As the winter wore on, the weather deteriorated and one night the farm was caught in a terrible storm. That same night the windmill was discovered to have been severely damaged. After investigating the damage, who did Napoleon claim was responsible for it?

After investigating the damage to the windmill, Napoleon announced that it had been caused by none other than Snowball who, he claimed, must have returned to take revenge for his expulsion as a traitor. Napoleon now declared that Snowball should be put to death if he is discovered in Animal Farm and promised honours and edible rewards to anyone who captures or kills the pig.

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Animal Farm by George Orwell Chapter 02

Animal Farm by George Orwell Chapter 02

Animal Farm by George Orwell Summary (Question and Answer)

Chapter Two

CHAPTER TWO

1.

10

After making his impassioned speech, Old Major died just a few days later leaving the rest of the animals to begin preparing the revolution. Orwell tells his readers that the majority of the planning naturally fell on the pigs. Why was this?

The work of teaching and organising naturally fell to the pigs because they were generally recognized as the most intelligent of the animals.

2.

10

Whilst Orwell tells his readers that Napoleon and Snowball were the most outstanding of the pigs, he also mentions Squealer, who we are told was a very effective public speaker and had the ability to ‘turn black into white’. What do you think Orwell means by this expression?

Orwell tells his readers that Squealer was a brilliant public speaker and by saying that he could turn black into white, he means that the pig was capable of persuading others of just about anything, even when it was patently incorrect.

3.

11

Together; Napoleon, Snowball and Squealer were able to develop Old Major’s call for a revolution into a coherent system of thought which they named ‘Animalism’. Holding a series of secret meetings after Mr Jones had gone to bed, they explained animalism to the other animals but met with varying degrees of apathy and incredulity. Among the animals to pose concerns was Mollie. What two concerns did she raise and how were these addressed by the pigs.

Mollie raised two concerns with animalism. The first of these was whether sugar will still be available for her after the revolution and the second was whether or not she would be allowed to wear ribbons in her mane as she had done until now. The pigs told her that sugar would not be available, as the animals would not have the ability to manufacture it on the farm and that the ribbons that she was so proud of and concerned about were nothing more than a ‘badge of slavery’ which pales into insignificance when compared to the rewards of liberty.

4.

12

The greatest opponent of animalism was Moses, the tame raven, who told the other animals about a mysterious country called Sugarcandy Mountain where all animals went after they died. Orwell tells his readers that many of the animals believed in Sugarcandy Mountain, but they all hated Moses. Why did they dislike him so much?

Orwell tells his readers that, whilst many animals believed Moses, they all hated him because ‘he told tales and did no work’.

5.

12

Among the animals who listened to the pigs, two became their most ardent supporters. Who were these two animals and how did they show their support.

The two animals to become the most loyal supporters of animalism were the two cart-horses: Boxer and Clover. They showed their support for animalism by internalising its message and repeating it to all of the other animals using short simple arguments. They would also lead the other animals in singing ‘Beasts of England’.

6.

12-13

Whilst many of the animals who believed in animalism thought that the revolution would be many years in the coming, it ended up happening rather suddenly one Sunday. Mr Jones had once been a good farmer but, after losing a large sum of money in a law suit, had turned to drink and further neglected his animals. What was the event which suddenly led to the uncoordinated and unplanned rebellion?

Mr Jones and his men had failed to feed the animals who, after waiting many hours, decided that they would have to help themselves by first breaking into the store house. When Mr Jones and his men saw what was happening and tried to stop the animals from helping themselves to their rations, the animals turned on their masters and chased them away from the farm.

7.

14

After galloping around the farm, what was the next action of the animals following the spontaneous revolution?

The animals returned to the farm buildings and headed straight for the harness room where they together destroyed all of the farming equipment which had been used by Mr Jones to dominate them.

8.

15-16

After a night’s rest, the animals awoke to discover that they were now indeed in control of the farm. The animals entered the farmhouse and took a look around the building but decided that no animals should ever live there. Rather than a residence, it was decided that the building should be kept as a museum. What did the animals do with the hams which they discovered hanging in the kitchen.

The animals took the hams outside and buried them.

9.

16

After announcing that the animals had a hard day of work ahead of them, the pigs went to the farm’s front gate where they crossed out the sign which read ‘Manor Farm’ and replaced it with the words ‘Animal Farm’. How had the pigs learned how to write?

The pigs explained to the other animals that they had learned the art of writing by studying u book which had once belonged to Mr Jones’s children.

10.

17

After changing the name of the farm, the pigs decided to inscribe the Seven Commandments of animalism on the wall. These seven commandments were as follows:

 

1.      Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy.

2.      Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend.

3.      No animal shall wear clothes.

4.      No animal shall sleep in a bed.

5.      No animal shall drink alcohol.

6.      No animal shall kill any other animal.

7.      All animals are equal.

 

Despite the fact that the pigs had only been learning how to write for three months, they had done a remarkably good job. What were the two mistakes which Snowball made whilst writing these seven commandments on the wall.

Snowball made two mistakes when he wrote these seven commandments on the wall. The first of these was that he wrote one of the S’s the wrong way around. The second was that be wrote ‘friend’ as ‘friend’.

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